#notbuyingit

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I have been following Miss Representation @representpledge on twitter for a couple of months. Earlier this week my feed was flooded by re-tweets to the company @vocconation. After doing some digging I found that Vocco Nation (located in Minneapolis) has launched a new campaign for the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. To “appeal” to the Las Vegas audience they created ads that promote their voice controlled media system using women’s body parts. Image

These ads are disgusting. Women are not objects. Sex does not sell. After their facebook page was inundated with comments regarding their degrading ads they deactivated their facebook page while trying to figure out what to do with their new found popularity. About an hour or so later they were back online and monitoring their comments by deleting ones which shed a negative light on their ads.

Thanks to Miss Representation, the #notbuyingit campaign has called out Vocco media on their sexist and objectifying campaign. Follow Miss Rep on twitter @representpledge and participate in their #notbuyingit campaign.

What do you think? Does sex sell? Are women visible in the technology world?

 

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8 thoughts on “#notbuyingit

  1. Jenna says:

    Thank you for your post! In my opinion, I think that sex does sell, but I think there are ways that we could go about marketing with sexual undertones that wouldn’t need to degrade and objectify women. I agree that these adds are disgusting and that women are not objects.

    Like

  2. Aleks says:

    I’m used to advertising being basically indistinguishable from pornography, but it should at least stand up to the expectations for decent pornography. Disembodied woman pieces are not up to code.

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    • Aleks says:

      Basically this ad selling a product that has nothing to do with sex and shouldn’t inherently appeal to heterosexual dudes more than any other group is much skeezier than Playboy would dream of being.

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      • sonyakuzy says:

        I think its a major cop out. They ran out of time to think of a creative marketing campaign, so naturally using women’s bodies was their idea.

        Like

  3. Aleks says:

    Oh indeed. And doing a really bad job of it. Compare to T-Mobile’s advertising: Carly Foulkes’ hotness has nothing intrinsically to do with phones, but they don’t use her in a way that’s likely to offend people or gross people out. They use her to make using their product look cool and glamorous. Does this do the same for Voco? Does it even tell you what the product does? That’s in tiny print overshadowed by the severed legs and lips. “Oral is better” has only the tiniest connection to an audio system (better if it were a toothbrush or something) and “Play with my v-spot” is likewise so obviously tacked on just for the purpose of saying something creepy sexual. As far as I know this is a product they would probably like to sell to everybody, but they seem to think that their market is exclusively sketchy hetero males.

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    • Aleks says:

      Excuse me, that was meant as a reply to sonyakuzy’s comment.

      And on closer inspection, one of the three systems in the legs ad is actually called the V-Spot which transfers some of the blame but certainly not all from the ad maker to the product namer. It suggests that these ads aren’t a one-off misfire.

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  4. I think sex definitely sells, if it didn’t it wouldn’t still be around. It’s a major seller, and it’s working. Even if these ads gross some people out, their target group is buying in and that’s enough to keep these ads running strong. Unfortunately, I think it’s also appealing for women to be in these ads because when there is so little representation for women in the advertising world at large, it’s intriguing to be ‘hot’ enough to even be considered for these patriarchal ads, and I think many women they have a hard time seeing that it’s the ads that are problematic, not their own bodies not being good enough.

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